Helsetilsynet

SINTEF Health Research has analysed data on compulsory admission and treatment for the Norwegian Board of Health, in cooperation with the National Directorate for Health and Social Affairs. The data describe patients treated in mental health services in 2003 and 2004.

In the first part of the report, some of the main results are presented, together with our assessment of the findings, in relation to the relevant legal framework. The second part of the report is SINTEF’s report “Analysis of Compulsory Treatment in Mental Health Services”, including an appendix where data on different types of compulsory admission and treatment are analyzed.

In SINTEF’s report it is suggested that use of compulsory admission and treatment is closely related to problems of poverty and homelessness. More than 40 per cent of the patients who had been admitted involuntarily or who had received compulsory treatment in mental health services, did not have a permanent residence. In addition, a large proportion of patients who did have their own homes, did not have suitable accommodation, or a satisfactory living situation. Patients who had been admitted involuntarily or who had received compulsory treatment generally had lower income, lower education and weaker social networks than patients receiving voluntary treatment.

There were large differences between regions and institutions in use of compulsory admission and treatment. The differences were large for all types of compulsory admission and treatment.

The results will be followed up by the Norwegian Board of Health in the Counties. However, we expect that the health and social services deal with the situation, and that managers on different levels follow up the results within their own area of responsibility.

Report from the Norwegian Board of Health 4/2006 (Pdf in Norwegian)

Summary in Norwegian